NFL Points Scored Career Leaders

Instead, figure out why the markup being generated is different on the client or server: If you intended to update the children of this node, you should instead have the existing children update their state and render the new components instead of calling ReactDOM. Jets' support system must help Darnold. Winners/losers: That's why Vikes paid Cousins

Watch: The Rush

The Bills are so bad, one of their players quit ... at halftime

Minnesota didn't win, but Kirk Cousins went a long way toward reaffirming the team's faith in him at quarterback. Who respected and protected Courtney Smith? Urban Meyer took a deep breath, stared ahead and waited for an answer to appear. The Seahawks have made the surprising decision to cut starting defensive tackle Tom Johnson, just one game into his stint with the team. Tom Pelissero of NFL Network reports that the Seahawks just want to free up a roster spot to bolster another position this week and plan to re-sign Johnson next week.

The Rush The Bills are so bad, one of their players quit That's why Vikes paid Cousins Minnesota didn't win, but Kirk Cousins went a long way toward reaffirming the team's faith in him at quarterback.

If you intended to update the children of this node, you should instead have the existing children update their state and render the new components instead of calling ReactDOM.

Target node has markup rendered by React, but there are unrelated nodes as well. This is most commonly caused by white-space inserted around server-rendered markup. Render methods should be a pure function of props and state; triggering nested component updates from render is not allowed. If necessary, trigger nested updates in componentDidUpdate. Target container is not a DOM element.

The node you're attempting to unmount was rendered by another copy of React. Teams are terrified of the too-good-to-be-true status of players, and so flaws will be found and harped on. For Vince Young , that flaw was his hilarious 6 score on the wonderlic. The outcry led to him re-taking the test, where he would score a 14 his second try. As much as we say it doesn't matter, scores that low tend to scare people.

It probably cost him being a 1st overall pick, though he was selected 3rd overall by the Titans in Looking back now, one could argue that the concerns were somewhat well-founded, given that it wasn't his lack of talent that basically ended his career, but a lack of maturity.

His work ethic and attitude came into question, and eventually he led to a dissolution of the Titans team at the time, as Jeff Fisher was fired and Young and others were cut or traded. It's hard to say he's anything but an indicator of when the negative results of the test actually do match poor results in the NFL.

This is probably the most clear cut of scenarios when it comes to the wonderlic dooming a prospect. Despite not accumulating a lot of playing time in college, Davenport showed plenty of potential when he did see the field, and could be described as a prototypical NFL quarterback as far as measurables are concerned. He could scramble, or tuck it and run, and had a big arm with decent accuracy. Oscar Davenport was eligible to be drafted in , widely regarded as a developmental prospect possibly worth a late round pick.

He went undrafted though, and never even made it onto an NFL roster as a developmental player. Surely this was due to his awful wonderlic score, which served to be just enough reason to let teams pass him by. Unfortunately we'll never know what, if any, potential Oscar Davenport had. Despite only getting 6 questions right on the wonderlic, the 49ers selected Frank Gore 65th overall in the third round of the NFL draft. Some may think that intelligence is not a needed quality for a running back, but that is something of a falsehood-- running backs have to learn blitz pickup schemes, have to excercise patience sometimes in waiting for running lanes to develop, and often have to learn routes and offensive schemes for catching passes whether it be in the backfield, or anywhere upfield.

Such things take study, and memorization. So let's not gloss over the obvious, there's been plenty of running backs who couldn't stick in the NFL becuase they couldn't grasp the offense or weren't able to learn and adjust to pick up free blitzers.

As far as Gore himself, he's probably the most successful player on this list, as he has become a fearsome running back in the NFL, a veritable force to be reckoned with.

He has a host of accolades to his name, and has rushed for nearly 10k yards and amassed 60 rushing TDs. Frank Gore is certainly the poster child for players who didn't let the wonderlic hold them back.

A decidedly unfortunate nickname for someone who would score so low on an intelligence test, Pig Prather was someone who suffered for it. Even though the average score for safetys in the NFL is only 19, his inglorious 5 was a problem for another reason: Rather than trying to read and react, or learn patterns from opposing offenses, Prather tended to just guess. Prather is proof that you can be plenty talented but if you can't apply knowledge and learn to adapt, the talent is useless in the NFL.

And as you might surmise, all the sloppy play on the field during college for Prather led to a nonexistent NFL career. Which isn't much of a shock. Especially at the safety position, teams would rather take slower, smarter players because of all the complexities of defensive schemes.

He's something of a lesson for kids learning football everywhere-- what you learn in a film room or with a coach is just as important as what you learn on the field. Darren Davis went undrafted in his year of declaration for the NFL draft, As far as Darren's collegiate career, he put up very strong numbers, rushing for over a 1, yards each year for the Iowa State Cyclones.

In the CFL he signed on with the Saskatchewan Roughriders, and rushed for over 1, yards in each of his first two seasons with the team. From there, he bounced around a number of CFL teams, before eventually falling out of the league in , unable to make the Montreal Alouettes opening day roster.

Was Darren doomed by his wonderlic, or merely not a complete enough running back to have a chance to make it in the NFL?

Hard to say for sure, but it seems likely that if he was good enough, he would've hung around to get back on the NFL radar.