32 Attacking Drills

List your event Need to give your event a boost? The set is performed mainly by the wrists. Other changes were made to lighten up calls on faults for carries and double-touches, such as allowing multiple contacts by a single player "double-hits" on a team's first contact provided that they are a part of a single play on the ball. Extend your arms while locking your elbows and turning your hands down at the wrists. Learning the Volleyball Set and Correct Mechanics

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Skills for Getting in Position to Volleyball Set

Use your hips and legs to pass, not the arms. Being able to move quickly into position is very important. Concentrate on getting into a stable position quickly, everytime you pass. If you utilize this technique every time you pass, with repetition you will train yourself to be a better passer. If you are going to take the ball with your hands to pass, it is usually easier to pass by using a quick finger action to direct the ball to your target.

This quick finger action sometimes multiple contacts of the fingers allows for better control. Only do this on the first team contact because on the second and third contact, multiple contacts are illegal. On balls that come right over the net or fall to you pretty slowly, it may be easiest to just take the ball like you normally would with your hands your normal setting motion.

Get Instant Access to my Setting Drills. Volleyball techniques for the approach consist of 3 or 4 foot steps.

The 3 step approach would be, left-right-left for right handed attackers, right-left-right for left handed attackers. Your last two steps are the ones that matter the most. First concentrate on learning the last two before working on 3 or 4 step approaches. Get Instant Access to my Attack Drills. Really focus on stepping quickly especially the last couple in order to maximize your jump height. Swing your arms back. By swinging your arms back you will take advantage of elastic energy and your nervous systems stretch reflex which can add inches to your vertical.

Bring both your arms up. By bring both your arms up you will continue with the momentum of going up which will help maximizing your height. Also, you will be in a better body position to hit. Contact the ball in front of your hitting shoulder. This develops a consistent armswing.

Volleyball techniques of a hitters footwork jumping from the correct spot have a big influence on you hitting the ball in your sweet spot.

Put top-spin on the ball. Being able to put top-spin on the ball when you hit allows you to have better angles when hitting, thus more court to hit into. Having good court vision involves making good judgments while watching the setter, the ball, and hitters.

The better you are able to judge where the ball is being passed, the better you can predict what the setter is going to do with it. Get Instant Acces to my Block Drills. Identify the front row players. All the blockers should know who the front row players are before the serve. Also, identify the setter as front row or back row to know if the setter can legally attack the second ball.

Other changes were made to lighten up calls on faults for carries and double-touches, such as allowing multiple contacts by a single player "double-hits" on a team's first contact provided that they are a part of a single play on the ball. In , the NCAA changed the minimum number of points needed to win any of the first four sets from 30 to 25 for women's volleyball men's volleyball remained at 30 for another 3 years, switching to 25 in If a fifth deciding set is reached, the minimum required score remains at In addition, the word "game" is now referred to as "set".

Changes in rules have been studied and announced by the FIVB in recent years, and they have released the updated rules in Competitive teams master six basic skills: A player stands behind the inline and serves the ball, in an attempt to drive it into the opponent's court.

The main objective is to make it land inside the court; it is also desirable to set the ball's direction, speed and acceleration so that it becomes difficult for the receiver to handle it properly. Also called reception, the pass is the attempt by a team to properly handle the opponent's serve, or any form of attack.

Proper handling includes not only preventing the ball from touching the court, but also making it reach the position where the setter is standing quickly and precisely.

The skill of passing involves fundamentally two specific techniques: The set is usually the second contact that a team makes with the ball.

As with passing, one may distinguish between an overhand and a bump set. Since the former allows for more control over the speed and direction of the ball, the bump is used only when the ball is so low it cannot be properly handled with fingertips, or in beach volleyball where rules regulating overhand setting are more stringent.

In the case of a set, one also speaks of a front or back set, meaning whether the ball is passed in the direction the setter is facing or behind the setter. There is also a jump set that is used when the ball is too close to the net.

In this case the setter usually jumps off his or her right foot straight up to avoid going into the net. Sometimes a setter refrains from raising the ball for a teammate to perform an attack and tries to play it directly onto the opponent's court. This movement is called a "dump".

The most common dumps are to 'throw' the ball behind the setter or in front of the setter to zones 2 and 4. More experienced setters toss the ball into the deep corners or spike the ball on the second hit. The attack, also known as the spike , is usually the third contact a team makes with the ball.

Ideally the contact with the ball is made at the apex of the hitter's jump. At the moment of contact, the hitter's arm is fully extended above his or her head and slightly forward, making the highest possible contact while maintaining the ability to deliver a powerful hit. The hitter uses arm swing, wrist snap, and a rapid forward contraction of the entire body to drive the ball.

A "kill" is the slang term for an attack that is not returned by the other team thus resulting in a point. Blocking refers to the actions taken by players standing at the net to stop or alter an opponent's attack. A block that is aimed at completely stopping an attack, thus making the ball remain in the opponent's court, is called offensive.

A well-executed offensive block is performed by jumping and reaching to penetrate with one's arms and hands over the net and into the opponent's area. The jump should be timed so as to intercept the ball's trajectory prior to it crossing over the net. Palms are held deflected downward roughly 45—60 degrees toward the interior of the opponents court. A "roof" is a spectacular offensive block that redirects the power and speed of the attack straight down to the attacker's floor, as if the attacker hit the ball into the underside of a peaked house roof.

By contrast, it is called a defensive, or "soft" block if the goal is to control and deflect the hard-driven ball up so that it slows down and becomes easier to defend.

A well-executed soft-block is performed by jumping and placing one's hands above the net with no penetration into the opponent's court and with the palms up and fingers pointing backward. Blocking is also classified according to the number of players involved.

Thus, one may speak of single or solo , double, or triple block. Successful blocking does not always result in a "roof" and many times does not even touch the ball.

While it's obvious that a block was a success when the attacker is roofed, a block that consistently forces the attacker away from his or her 'power' or preferred attack into a more easily controlled shot by the defense is also a highly successful block. At the same time, the block position influences the positions where other defenders place themselves while opponent hitters are spiking. Digging is the ability to prevent the ball from touching one's court after a spike or attack, particularly a ball that is nearly touching the ground.

It is especially important while digging for players to stay on their toes; several players choose to employ a split step to make sure they're ready to move in any direction. Some specific techniques are more common in digging than in passing. A player may sometimes perform a "dive", i. When the player also slides his or her hand under a ball that is almost touching the court, this is called a "pancake".

The pancake is frequently used in indoor volleyball, but rarely if ever in beach volleyball because the uneven and yielding nature of the sand court limits the chances that the ball will make a good, clean contact with the hand. When used correctly, it is one of the more spectacular defensive volleyball plays. Sometimes a player may also be forced to drop his or her body quickly to the floor to save the ball.

In this situation, the player makes use of a specific rolling technique to minimize the chances of injuries. Volleyball is essentially a game of transition from one of the above skills to the next, with choreographed team movement between plays on the ball. These team movements are determined by the teams chosen serve receive system, offensive system, coverage system, and defensive system.

The serve-receive system is the formation used by the receiving team to attempt to pass the ball to the designated setter. Systems can consist of 5 receivers, 4 receivers, 3 receivers, and in some cases 2 receivers. The most popular formation at higher levels is a 3 receiver formation consisting of two left sides and a libero receiving every rotation. This allows middles and right sides to become more specialized at hitting and blocking.

Offensive systems are the formations used by the offense to attempt to ground the ball into the opposing court or otherwise score points. Formations often include designated player positions with skill specialization see Player specialization , below. Popular formations include the , , and systems see Formations , below.

There are also several different attacking schemes teams can use to keep the opposing defense off balance. Coverage systems are the formations used by the offense to protect their court in the case of a blocked attack.

Executed by the 5 offensive players not directly attacking the ball, players move to assigned positions around the attacker to dig up any ball that deflects off the block back into their own court. Popular formations include the system and the system. In lieu of a system, some teams just use a random coverage with the players nearest the hitter. Defensive systems are the formations used by the defense to protect against the ball being grounded into their court by the opposing team.

The system will outline which players are responsible for which areas of the court depending on where the opposing team is attacking from. There are also several different blocking schemes teams can employ to disrupt the opposing teams offense. When one player is ready to serve, some teams will line up their other five players in a screen to obscure the view of the receiving team.

This action is only illegal if the server makes use of the screen, so the call is made at the referee's discretion as to the impact the screen made on the receiving team's ability to pass the ball.

The most common style of screening involves a W formation designed to take up as much horizontal space as possible. Coaching for volleyball can be classified under two main categories: The objective of match coaching is to win a match by managing a team's strategy. Developmental coaching emphasizes player development through the reinforcement of basic skills during exercises known as " drills. A coach will construct drills that simulate match situations thereby encouraging speed of movement, anticipation, timing, communication, and team-work.

At the various stages of a player's career, a coach will tailor drills to meet the strategic requirements of the team. The American Volleyball Coaches Association is the largest organization in the world dedicated exclusively to volleyball coaching. There are 5 positions filled on every volleyball team at the elite level. Each of these positions plays a specific, key role in winning a volleyball match. At some levels where substitutions are unlimited, teams will make use of a Defensive Specialist in place of or in addition to a Libero.

This position does not have unique rules like the libero position, instead, these players are used to substitute out a poor back row defender using regular substitution rules. Join Active or Sign In. Learn More Customer Login. List your event Need to give your event a boost? Team Hitting Drills Teams that don't hit effectively won't succeed on the court. Hitter Coverage Drill Digging a blocked ball is one of the most challenging parts of a volleyball match.

Attacker Vision Training It's important for attackers to recognize a block when on the offensive. Volleyball Player's Guide to Finger Taping Whether you're a hitter or a blocker, you're going to do some damage to your fingernails. Are you sure you want to delete this family member? Find activities close to home. Activities near you will have this indicator.